Let's keep our college graduates in New Jersey

Let's keep our college graduates in New Jersey

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GLASSBORO? As the dean of Rowan University's College of Engineering, I am concerned about the loss of New Jersey's talented college graduates as they pursue job prospects in neig
by Dr. James Tracey, Rowan University

GLASSBORO? As the dean of Rowan University's College of Engineering, I am concerned about the loss
of New Jersey's talented college graduates as they pursue job prospects in neighboring states, brain drain as it
is more commonly known.

New Jersey business leaders and government officials can keep this from happening by taking steps to
attract more businesses to the state. Fortunately, an opportunity to do just that has arisen. New Jersey's
aircraft repair and maintenance facilities are currently at a competitive disadvantage due to less restrictive tax
laws in neighboring states. The northeast region is the largest market for jet aircraft, with no one state
designated as the region's premier repair and maintenance headquarters. This leaves a void New Jersey has
the opportunity to fill, bringing hundreds of jobs to the state.

There is legislation, sponsored by Senator James Cafiero (R-Cape May), on Governor Whitman's desk
that would greatly spur economic development and create good jobs in southern New Jersey by granting
tax-exempt status to repairs and maintenance performed on non-commercial aircraft. If Governor Whitman
signs this legislation, she will give New Jersey the chance to take the lead in the region's repair and
maintenance industry and in turn, better position our state to create good engineering jobs for our graduates.

I encourage you and your readers to contact the governor's office as soon as possible about this very
important piece of legislation, S487. New Jersey's economic well being depends on it.