Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers awards Rowan teams

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Rowan University College of Engineering students took the top two places at the recent Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Embedded Systems Hackathon at Drexel University.

Rowan University College of Engineering students took the top two places at the recent Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Embedded Systems Hackathon at Drexel University.

A panel that included industry professionals honored two teams from the Rowan IEEE student organization at the event, which provided an opportunity for engineering students to create innovative and useful projects while also encouraging them to improve their skills with Arduino. Arduino is a small, customizable and programmable computer that enables users to manage electronics in multidisciplinary projects.

About 20 teams from Rowan, Drexel, the University of Delaware and the University of Pennsylvania participated in the competition, with Rowan students comprising seven of the teams. 

The teams were provided with an Arduino kit and permitted to bring their own personal materials to complete their programmed device.

Following the nine-hour design and construction phase, the panel judged the teams’ devices on three criteria: the possibility of the device’s commercialization, the importance of the issue solved by the device, and the creativity and design of the device.

The first place team, which was awarded $300, comprised alumnus David Calhoun, 23, of Matawan, N.J.; graduate student Charlotte Cecere, 22, of Buena, N.J.; junior Christen Corrado, 20, of Freehold, N.J.; and sophomore Jeffrey Eker, 19, of Haddonfield, N.J.

The team created a clawed device, which was operated by a microcontroller through a touchscreen.  The microcontroller was intended to direct the movement of each individual finger — an innovation that could be used for military application or the design of prosthetic limbs. Following the competition, the team donated its work to IEEE for use as a demonstration device.

The second place team, which was awarded $200, comprised junior Dillon Buck, 22, of Washington Township, N.J.; junior AbdülSamed Özdemir, 21, of Glassboro, N.J.; junior Brian Finch, 21, of Moorestown, N.J.; and junior Brennan Batalla, 21, of Lacey Township, N.J.

The second team created a roving home security system that successfully secured its intended area while evading nearby obstacles. The device also triggered an alarm when encountering any potential moving threats.

 

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