Rowan Engineering: A family tradition

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Common family traditions often include Sunday dinners and holiday gatherings, but for Jared and James Salvatore, 21-year-old twins from Hammonton, N.J., their family has unintentionally begun a new and unique tradition — attendance at Rowan University’s College of Engineering.

Common family traditions often include Sunday dinners and holiday gatherings, but for Jared and James Salvatore, 21-year-old twins from Hammonton, N.J., their family has unintentionally begun a new and unique tradition — attendance at Rowan University’s College of Engineering.

Jared and James, electrical and computer engineering seniors, enrolled in the engineering program in 2010 and were preceded by their older brothers, Daryl Jr., 24, and Domenic, 23.

“We came [to Rowan] because it was one of the best places to go, especially for engineering,” Jared said. “Rowan has an excellent engineering program. It’s challenging. If you ask anyone, they’ll tell you that.”

Daryl, a manufacturing engineer at O & S Research in Cinnaminson, N.J., graduated from Rowan’s Mechanical Engineering program in 2011. He was shortly followed by Domenic, who graduated from the program in 2012 and recently accepted a position as a process engineer at the Derbyshire Machine & Tool Co. in Philadelphia.

Domenic described his overall experience in Rowan’s engineering program as “a positive one.”

Professors make a difference

“The professors were very involved,” he said. “They push you to get the best out of you.”

Daryl also agreed that the program’s size aided in his development within the program.

“They had relatively small classes, and I got to work closely with professors,” he said. “It was really nice to work one-on-one with my professors. You wouldn’t see that with a large university.”

The youngest Salvatore brother, Spencer, 11, may even follow in the footsteps of his brothers.

“Spencer grew up somewhat quicker than other kids his age because he has older brothers,” Jared said. “He definitely has a more mature mindset, and he’s mentioned before that he wants to be a mechanical engineer like Daryl and Domenic.”

Family legacy

Although college may still be a distant thought for the youngest brother, Daryl said he would not be surprised if Spencer were to enroll in Rowan’s engineering program. 

“I think its funny because I see in him why he would want to become a mechanical engineer,” Daryl said. “I see things in him that I did as a kid — the way he analyzes stuff and builds LEGOs.”

Domenic agreed and described the prospect of Spencer’s future in engineering as “exciting.”

“I’d be proud of him no matter what he ended up doing, but I would never deter him from [the engineering program],” Domenic said.

But the family tradition at Rowan doesn’t stop with the five Salvatore brothers.

“We had family who went to Rowan before it was actually even called Rowan,” Jared said.

Started with Dad

In 1984, the brothers’ father, Daryl Sr., received his bachelor’s degree in business at Glassboro State College, which officially became known as Rowan in 1992 following Henry and Betty Rowan’s $100 million gift to the school.

While Jared and James expect to graduate from the University in May 2015, James said they still are exploring what the field of engineering has to offer, and they plan to apply for summer internships.

Despite the challenging and competitive environment within the field, sibling rivalry is not a factor within this duo. James and Jared said they work as a team to successfully complete Rowan’s engineering program.

“We mostly take the same classes,” Jared said. “This semester, we’re taking three classes together.” 

Love of gaming

The twins’ shared passion in the gaming universe also played a major role in their choice of career path.

“Our interest in video games was a big reason why we went into electrical and computer engineering,” Jared said.

While the brothers said they play fewer video games at Rowan in order to focus further on their studies, gaming remains a hobby.

In fact, Jared plans to concentrate his engineering clinic project – a hands-on learning opportunity – on video gaming design.

However, James said he may step outside of his expertise during the clinic in order to design a special iPhone app.

“I’m learning how to program a code for measuring and converting temperature,” he said. “I wanted to see if I could branch out. Much of my [life], I’ve used C++ coding language, so the project was a way to learn a different language of coding.”

Whether embracing their interests or gaining new experience in the classroom and clinic, Jared and James hope to take full advantage of the opportunities within the College of Engineering, and much like their brothers, they plan to join in their family tradition by walking across the commencement stage and accepting their Rowan University diplomas.

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