Coming up ACEs: Rowan teacher education students again recognized nationally

Coming up ACEs: Rowan teacher education students again recognized nationally

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Simply put, the 150 members of Rowan University’s Eta Psi chapter of Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), the international honor society in education, are coming up ACEs.

Simply put, the 150 members of Rowan University’s Eta Psi chapter of Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), the international honor society in education, are coming up ACEs.

For the second time, the chapter has been named the recipient of the Achieving Chapter Excellence Award (ACE) from KDP. The award, which is presented bi-annually, recognizes KDP chapters for exceptional leadership, programming, and involvement.

It takes “a very special chapter” to excel in all three areas, according to Carol Paddock, program manager of leadership and recognition for KDP.

Rowan, which received the ACE for the first time in 2011, is one of only 22 chapters to claim the honor. Altogether, KDP has 600 chapters nationwide, according to Paddock.

Members of the Eta Psi chapter will accept their award next month during KDP’s Convocation in Dallas. Rowan College of Education Professors Cori Meredith and Martha Viator are the chapter advisers.

“This was a group project and a group award,” says Rosalyn Wodlinger, who served as president of KDP last spring. “We’re excited and proud to maintain KDP’s tradition of excellence at Rowan.”

In addition to providing members with professional development and service activities, KDP hosts two community events: the holiday pajama party each fall and “Literacy Alive” each spring. Both events bring children to Rowan’s campus and promote literacy and learning.  

“Involvement in KDP absolutely made me a better teacher,” says Wodlinger, a 2013 graduate who just began her teaching career at Schalick High School. “It helped me with organization and, also, with communication skills. Those skills are essential, particularly when you begin student teaching.

“Through KDP, you get to meet so many other teachers—from all areas of education—and to share new ideas. It’s also great to make connections with children during our events.”

KDP has grown significantly in just a few years, according to Wodlinger. Just six years ago, about 35 students were part of the society. Today, the chapter boasts 150 members.

To join KDP, students must have a 3.5 grade point average and must have completed 30 credit hours of coursework.

According to its website, KDP was founded in 1911 to foster excellence in education and promote fellowship among those dedicated to teaching. The founders chose the name from the Greek words representing knowledge, duty and power.

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