Edelman Planetarium presents stars in a whole new light

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The Edelman Planetarium at Rowan University is premiering a new program called STARS. Audiences will explore the lives of the stars, how they are born, how they die and how human understanding of the stars has changed over time.

The Edelman Planetarium at Rowan University is premiering a new program called STARS. Audiences will explore the lives of the stars, how they are born, how they die and how human understanding of the stars has changed over time.

Every star has a story. Some stars are faint and almost forgotten. Others burn bright and end their lives in powerful explosions. New stars are created every day within vast clouds of gas and dust. Through every phase of their existence, stars release the energy that powers the universe. Long ago, some of them produced the elements that make up our bodies. Journey to the furthest reaches of our galaxy and experience both the awesome beauty and destructive power of STARS.

This dramatic program features the voice talent of Mark Hamill (“Luke Skywalker”) and full-dome animation by the National Space Centre, Leicester, U.K. The Nashville Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Albert-George Schram, resident conductor, performed part of the original STARS soundtrack.

STARS will play on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. through March 11. Ticket prices are $5 for adults, $3 for children 12 and younger and $3 for seniors older than 60. The planetarium is located in the Science Hall on the main Rowan campus, adjacent to Rt. 322.

STARS was produced by Sudekum Planetarium at the Adventure Science Center in Nashville. The program includes a live presentation by the planetarium director of examples of various kinds of interesting stars in the current night sky, as generated by the new SciDome HD digital video display system.

Parents will appreciate the fact that this show is more accessible to young children than most of Rowan’s public shows. An entertaining sequence in the middle of the show brings Orion and his faithful hunting dog to life, and they portray in an active and humorous fashion some of the famous folks through history who have uncovered the mysteries of the stars, including a young Albert Einstein, Galileo and prehistoric figures who first gazed at the stars. The show is suitable for children six years of age and older.

For more information about STARS and the Edelman Planetarium, visit www.rowan.edu/planetarium.  Questions may be directed to planetarium director Keith Johnson at johnsonk@rowan.edu.
  
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