Rowan hosts teentech, hands-on technology experience for h.s. girls

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Ninth through 11th grade New Jersey girls may attend teentech 2011, a day of hands-on workshops on Tuesday, May 24, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. hosted by Rowan University, Glassboro, in partnership with the American Association of University Women-NJ (AAUW-NJ), the New Jersey Technology Education Association (NJTEA) and the Educational Information & Resource Center (EIRC). The goal of the program, which will be held in Rowan Hall, the College of Engineering building off Bowe Boulevard, is to encourage the girls to explore the many high-demand, well-paying careers in technology areas.

Ninth through 11th grade New Jersey girls may attend teentech 2011, a day of hands-on workshops on Tuesday, May 24, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. hosted by Rowan University, Glassboro, in partnership with the American Association of University Women-NJ (AAUW-NJ), the New Jersey Technology Education Association (NJTEA) and the Educational Information & Resource Center (EIRC). The goal of the program, which will be held in Rowan Hall, the College of Engineering building off Bowe Boulevard, is to encourage the girls to explore the many high-demand, well-paying careers in technology areas.

Civil and environmental engineering professor Dr. Kauser Jahan is coordinating the workshops. “We have planned an exciting day designed to give the girls direct experience with the many facets of technology, from building bridges to making lip gloss.  We want them to experience technology as creative, exciting and fun,” she said.

Kenneth Zushma, president of NJTEA and a technology teacher at Heritage Middle School in Livingston, emphasized that teentech fits perfectly with his group’s ongoing initiatives to involve more young women in hands-on technology.

AAUW-NJ became involved in this effort 10 years ago, when the national association published “Gender Gaps,” a report that highlighted the great disparity in the numbers of women and men involved in the technology work so critical to the country’s future. According to Jean Wadsworth, AAUW-NJ’s project director for teentech , “AAUW’s recently published follow-up report, ‘Why So Few?’, tells us that the problem still exists.  In fact, the number of women involved in what we call the STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math) has actually decreased. AAUW-NJ is determined to do whatever we can to ensure that our young women are positioned to take full advantage of lucrative, exciting, fulfilling technology careers and, at the same time, reach their full potential as contributors to our country’s continued competitiveness as a world economic power.”

Girls and high school educators who are interested in participating in teentech 2011 can find more information at www.aauwnj.org or www.njtea.org.

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