Distinguished scientist to discuss liquid crystals at Rowan's Physics Colloquium

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Students, faculty and guests at Rowan University will have the opportunity to examine the science behind laptop and cell phone screens during Rowan University’s Physics Colloquium on Friday, Sept. 17. Guest speaker Dr. Tom Lubensky is scheduled to address the topic of liquid crystals in his lecture “Liquid Crystals – an Elementary Primer.” The colloquium, the first in the Physics Colloquium Series, will be presented by Rowan’s Department of Physics and Astronomy and will be held in Science Hall at 3:30 p.m.

Students, faculty and guests at Rowan University will have the opportunity to examine the science behind laptop and cell phone screens during Rowan University’s Physics Colloquium on Friday, Sept. 17. Guest speaker Dr. Tom Lubensky is scheduled to address the topic of liquid crystals in his lecture “Liquid Crystals – an Elementary Primer.” The colloquium, the first in the Physics Colloquium Series, will be presented by Rowan’s Department of Physics and Astronomy and will be held in Science Hall at 3:30 p.m.

Lubensky aims to expand the audience’s understanding of the phases of matter from solids, liquids and gases to liquid crystal, a phase capable of exhibiting both liquid and solid characteristics. Lubensky will take listeners on a tour of the world of liquid crystals, including their ability to controllably deform (the characteristic that makes them ideal for high resolution displays) and their subtle topological defects (that make them ideal models for the study of deep mathematical truths).

Lubensky is currently the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Physics and the chair of the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Pennsylvannia.  He earned his B.S. in physics from the California Institute of Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. Among Lubensky’s major awards are a Sloan Fellowship (1975) and a Guggenheim Fellowship (1981), election to both the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2000) and the National Academy of Sciences (2002), and the Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society (2004).

 

 

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