Rowan Accepts Applications for New Environmental Studies Program

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Rowan University is accepting applications for its new bachelor of arts in environmental studies program, which will kick off in fall 2006.

The new degree program will offer students two tracks (na

Rowan University is accepting applications for its new bachelor of arts in environmental studies program, which will kick off in fall 2006.

The new degree program will offer students two tracks (natural sciences and social sciences) and will include classes?many team-taught?in biological sciences, chemistry and biochemistry, geography and anthropology, philosophy and religion, psychology and sociology. The bachelor of arts in environmental studies program will provide a broad, interdisciplinary approach grounded in specially designed courses that link the biological, chemical, physical and social aspects of the environment and provide students with the flexibility to focus their work in any of these areas while obtaining some exposure to each field of knowledge. The program will highlight the main concerns regarding the environment, and it will be especially useful for individuals seeking a broader knowledge base and a deeper understanding of the environment.

Students will pursue a core course group in either track; complete a hands-on, yearlong senior seminar project; and study ethics as well, an offering not usually found in other environmental studies programs.

"Our students will learn how inter-related environmental issues are and how they are connected to all social and human dimensions," said Dr. Patricia Mosto, interim associate provost and former chair of the Biological Sciences Department.

Designed to help fill a growing need for well-rounded, well-trained professionals, the interdisciplinary program will provide students with the knowledge and skills to follow many paths in environmental fields; government, policy-making and law; industry; and education, as well as to enter graduate school.

"This will be so broad-based a program that it will train a wide variety of students to engage in the environmental enterprise," said Dr. Robert Newland, chair of Rowan's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. "There will be many fields they can enter because they will be broadly educated in environmental concerns."

"We need a population of people really aware of the environment to make changes," Mosto said. "The Rowan bachelor's degree will help accomplish this purpose through broadening human consciousness about resources, and their use and abuse, in order to improve the world."

For more information, visit www.rowan.edu/environmentalstudies.

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