Author of <+>Why We Hate<+> to Discuss Hate Crime Prevention on Feb. 16

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Dr. Jack Levin, sociologist and celebrated author of "Why We Hate," "The Violence of Hate" and "Killer on Campus," will discuss hate crimes prevention on Wednesday, February 16, at Rowan University.

Presentation Featured During Rowan's African American History Festivities

Dr. Jack Levin, sociologist and celebrated author of "Why We Hate," "The Violence of Hate" and "Killer on Campus," will discuss hate crimes prevention on Wednesday, February 16, at Rowan University. The presentation will begin at 1:45 p.m. in the Rowan Hall auditorium, near the corner of Route 322 and Joseph Bowe Boulevard. The event is free and open to the public.

Levin's presentation, "Ordinary People, Extraordinary Courage;" will focus on the social sources of good Samaritans and on what ordinary individuals can do to reduce hate crimes and inter-group violence. The lecture will draw from his years of pioneering research in the areas of hate crimes, mass murder and those who commit such crimes. He work has led to many publications, both popular and scholarly, making him a major force in disseminating the findings of sociology and criminology to the general public and international opinion leaders.

In addition, Levin is Brudnick Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Northeastern University and director of that university's Brudnick Center on Violence and Conflict. He also currently serves as the Robin M. Williams, Jr. Distinguished Lecturer 2004-05 for the Eastern Sociological Society. He has written more than 150 articles in professional journals and newspapers, including The New York Times, Boston Globe, Dallas Morning News, Philadelphia Inquirer, Christian Science Monitor, Chicago Tribune, and USA Today.

Levin has served as guest commentator on national network newscasts and television programs, including "48 Hours," "20/20," "Dateline NBC," "The Today Show," "Good Morning America," "Oprah," "Rivera Live" and "Larry King Live." He also has spoken to a wide variety of community, academic and professional groups, including the White House Conference on Hate Crimes, the Department of Justice, the Department of Education and the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

Co-sponsored by the Eastern Sociological Society and Rowan University Office of the Provost, Sociology Department, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and Thomas N. Bantivoglio Honors Program; the February 16 lecture is being held in conjunction with the University's 2005 African American History Month observance. For more information, contact the Rowan Sociology Department at 856-256-4884.

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